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Journey to the End of Night

Film of Peter Tammer

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Journey to the End of Night


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DVD Price $125
Streaming Price (1 year) $125
Streaming Price (1 year) + DVD $188
Streaming Price (3 years) $300
Streaming Price (3 yeas) + DVD $363

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The film based on the recollections of a shattered and traumatized man, a former escapee from the advancing Japanese army relates the horrors of war, his doubts and misgivings of the support of comrades, his fear for the loss of his best friend, and of course, his own fear of dying.

Journey to the End of Night is the diary of a soldier. Although it was filmed forty years after the event, it is a timeless universal testimony because of its power and emotion. It is the voice of an individual raised against the violence, the horror and the futility of war.

The film raises one question which continues to haunt us: a soldier is trained to kill, but not to commit murder. Who can draw the line?

Awards:

Melbourne Film Festival 1982  The Ten Award For Documentary Excellence
Australian Film Awards 1982 The Jury Prize

Also selected for showing at:
Sydney Film Festival 1982
Edinburgh International Film Festival 1982
Berlin Forum 1983
Ghent Film Festival 1983
San Francisco International Film Festival 1983

 

1964-1973, beginning as an independent filmmaker and freelance editor, Peter worked at Eltham Films, Commonwealth Film Unit, and also produced some extremely low-budget commercials.

Between 1973-1975 he was employed as a Tutor in a film course for teacher training at Melbourne State College, Carlton. Peter was also a founding member of the Melbourne Filmmaker's Co-op when setting up at the Spring St. venue, and a contributing member at Lygon St., Carlton venue until 1976.

1976-1978 Peter left his teaching position at Melb State College, and returned to freelance editing. In 1977 he was approached by Brian Robinson to take on part-time teaching at Swinburne F&TV.

1979-1998 Peter was appointed Lecturer in Film at Swinburne, later VCA Film and TV School. Between 1979 and 1983 he taught the 2nd year of the Undergraduate course, and when Nigel Buesst retired Peter was appointed to supervise the Post Graduate course in Narrative/Drama.

Following study leave which included a trip to America in 1985 to examine the early versions of computerised editing systems for film and television, Peter was appointed Senior Lecturer in Film at Swinburne, afterwards the VCA, continuing his role as "year lecturer" for the narrative/drama stream of the Post-Graduate course.

1996-1998 Peter helped initiate and was placed in charge of a specialised strand for Documentary in the VCA Post-Graduate course, and in partnership with Megan Spencer as co-manager, ran "The Doco Club" on a regular weekly basis introducing members and visitors to a wide range of documentary productions from local and international sources. Peter retired from the VCA in July 1998.

Throughout the period 1977 - 1998 Peter continued producing his personal films which are recorded in the filmography below, winning some major awards. As listed, some of his films were invited to participate in local and overseas festivals.

Peter is now living in Kyneton, central Victoria. See Peter Tammer's website


Awards:

Melbourne Film Festival 1982 The Ten Award For Documentary Excellence
Australian Film Awards 1982 The Jury Prize

"...so compelling that one accepts long passages of monologue as if they were action-packed depictions. From this harrowing confessional emerges one more example of war's essential obscenity." The Herald, Keith Connolly 1982

" ... which draws the spectator into an hallucinatory psychodrama." Ghent Film Festival , Belgium, 1983

"In one sense Bill Neave's is the single greatest performance in the Festival; in a more teasing sense, it seems of course scarcely a performance at all. By collapsing past and present, Tammer has created a remarkable sense of forty years of one man's life." Brian McFarlane, Cinema Papers, August 1982

 

"Hello Peter,

 

 

Whilst i cannot say i 'like' your film , it is one of the most moving and powerful films i have ever been witness to.

I sat un-moving except for the tears running down my face.

To sit and see this mans private nightmare...   reminds me that we the public know so little of the truth.

I'm a youth worker and painter... I work with young men primarily at a local high school, & I will find an opprortunity to show it to them at some point.  My sincere thanks...."

 

 

 

 

 

 

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