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Brushes with Fame: The Story Behind the Archibald Portrait Prize

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Brushes with Fame: The Story Behind the Archibald Portrait Prize


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DVD Price $220
Streaming Price (1 year) $220
Streaming Price (1 year) + DVD $374
Streaming Price (3 years) $528
Streaming Price (3 years) + DVD $682

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Brushes With Fame tells the story of the Archibald Portrait Prize, Australia’s most coveted, controversial and popular art prize. It tells the story of how Australia’s great painters have created new and startling images to explore our national sense of identity and character.

The film begins as Wendy Sharpe wins The Archibald in 1996. We then follow a group of exceptional painters preparing their portraits for the 1997 Archibald Prize. This is one of the very few films where we see individual artists at work.  For each artist it is a unique and very personal process. We follow Fred Cress painting playwright David Williamson, Kerrie Lester painting dancer Janet Vernon, Bill Leak painting  pop star Tex Perkins, Martin Sharp painting Tiny Tim, Garry Shead painting Adam Rich a doctor and an artist, Salvatore Zofrea painting Opera singer Elizabeth Campbell, Rose McKinley painting poet les Murray, Jenny Sages painting sculptor Tom Bass and Robert Hannaford painting the scientist Paul Davies. Each of these sitters must have made a significant contribution to public life in Australia.

Begun in 1921, The Archibald portrait Prize is unique in the world, attracting over 500 entries each year from all over Australia. The judging process, which has never been filmed before  is held in secret behind closed doors and is always controversial

Barry Pearce describes the furore that erupted around William Dobell’s 1944 ground-breaking portrait of Joshua Smith and how it opened the doors to the issues of modern art. What were the boundaries for an artist to challenge and how far beyond these could an artist go? Wendy Whiteley tells the story of how Brett Whiteley won the Archibald twice in the late seventies with brutally honest self portraits, that again broke new ground for the Archibald Prize.

Richard Mordaunt is one of Australia’s most experienced documentary film-makers with 40 years experience producing feature documentaries in Australia and the UK. Throughout the 60s and 70s, using the first lightweight cameras, he photographed and directed award winning documentaries in the UK. House of the Rising Sun, Voices, Sweet Soul Music, Ireland Behind the Wire, Seeds of a New Life.

In 1979 he moved to Australia with his partner Diana Barbara and they continued to make documentaries for the Australian and International market.

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